Courses

Undergraduate

BIOL 101a Biochemistry & Biophysics

The study of life at the molecular level. Topics include the three-dimensional structures and function of large biological molecules, the human genome, and the design of antiviral drugs to treat HIV/AIDS. Prerequisite:   The first of four modules in a yearlong foundations biology sequence; meets for the first half of the fall term.

Professor: Michael Koelle
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.

BIOL 101b Biochemistry & Biophysics

The study of life at the molecular level. Topics include the three-dimensional structures and function of large biological molecules, the human genome, and the design of antiviral drugs to treat HIV/AIDS.  The first of four modules in a yearlong foundations biology sequence; meets for the first half of the spring term.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.

BIOL 102a Principles of Cell Biology and Membrane Physiology

The study of cell biology and membrane physiology. Topics include organization and functional properties of biological membranes, membrane physiology and signaling, rough endoplasmic reticulum and synthesis of membrane/secretory membrane proteins, endocytosis, the cytoskeleton, and cell division. The second of four modules in a yearlong foundations biology sequence; meets for the second half of the term.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.

BIOL 102b Principles of Cell Biology and Membrane Physiology

The study of cell biology and membrane physiology. Topics include organization and functional properties of biological membranes, membrane physiology and signaling, rough endoplasmic reticulum and synthesis of membrane/secretory membrane proteins, endocytosis, the cytoskeleton, and cell division.  Prerequisite:   The second of four modules in a yearlong foundations biology sequence; meets for the second half of the term.

Professor: Mark Mooseker
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.

BIOL 103a Genes and Development

The study of genes, genetics, and developmental biology. How genes control development and disease; Mendel’s rules; examples of organ physiology. Prerequisite:   The third of four modules in a yearlong foundations biology sequence; meets for the first half of the fall term.

Professor: Vivian Irish
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.

BIOL 103b Genes and Development

The study of genes, genetics, and developmental biology. How genes control development and disease; Mendel’s rules; examples of organ physiology. Prerequisite:   The third of four modules in a yearlong foundations biology sequence; meets for the first half of the spring term.

Professor: Weimin Zhong
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.

BIOL 104a Principles of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

The study of ecology, evolutionary biology, animal behavior, and the history of life. Evolutionary transitions and natural selection. Adaptation at genic, chromosomal, cellular, organismal, and supra-organismal levels. Distributional and social consequences of particular suites of organismal adaptations.  Prerequisite:   The fourth of four modules in a yearlong foundations biology sequence; meets for the second half of the term.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.

BIOL 104b Principles of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

The study of ecology, evolutionary biology, animal behavior, and the history of life. Evolutionary transitions and natural selection. Adaptation at genic, chromosomal, cellular, organismal, and supra-organismal levels. Distributional and social consequences of particular suites of organismal adaptations.  Prerequisite:   The fourth of four modules in a yearlong foundations biology sequence; meets for the second half of the term.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.

MCDB 040b The Science and Politics of Cancer

Fundamentals of cell biology, Darwinian evolution, immunology, and genetics that underlie cancer; the history of cancer science and treatment; historical and current policy issues.  Prerequisite: a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement test in Biology or equivalent.  Enrollment limited to Freshmen; preregistration required.  Many not be taken after CSSY 290.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.

MCDB 050a Immunology and Microbes

Introduction to the immune system and its interaction with specific microbes.  Attention both to microbes that cause illness, such as influenza, HIV, and HPV, and to microbes that live in harmony with humans, collectively called the microbiome.  Readings include novels and historical works on diseases such as polio and AIDS. Enrollment limited to freshmen.  Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Professor: Paula Kavathas
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30p.m. - 3:45p.m.

MCDB 103b Cancer

Introduction to the biology of cancer, with a focus on leukemia, skin cancer, and cancers linked to infection. Topics include genetics, biochemistry, immunity, infection agents, and challenges for prevention and treatment. Intended for non–science majors and underclassmen.

Professor: Alexia Belperron
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.

MCDB 105a or b An Issues Approach to Biology

Biological concepts taught in context of current societal issues, such as stem cell research and genetically modified organisms. Emphasis on biological literacy to enable students to evaluate scientific arguments.

Fall: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=10961&term=201303

Spring: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=20925&term=201401

Professor: Patrick Sung, Professor: Ronald Breaker, Professor: Dieter Soll
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016, Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:25p.m.

MCDB 106 Malaria Lyme & Vector Borne Disease

Introduction to the biology of pathogen transmission from one organism to another by insects; special focus on malaria and Lyme disease. Biology of the pathogens including modes of transmission and establishment of infection; immune responses and the associated challenges to prevention and treatment.

Intended for non–science majors; preference to freshmen and sophomores. Prerequisite: high school biology.

Professor: Alexia Belperron
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 109 Immunity and Contagion

Introduction to the human immune system, followed by study of microorganisms such as influenza, HIV, human papilloma virus, and human microbiota. Discussion of the biology of each organism and interaction with the host immune system, reinforcing principles of immune function.

Enrollment limited to freshmen and sophomores.

Professor: Paula Kavathas
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30pm - 3:20pm

MCDB 166 From Microbes to Molecules

The first term of a yearlong introduction to biology and chemistry through research on soil bacteria. Focus on the discovery of antibiotics from soil bacteria isolated from the Yale campus. Diversity of life, structure of biomolecules, components of a cell, molecular basis of gene expression, heritability, and symbiosis. Comparison with eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. Class sessions include lecture and laboratory components.

Enrollment limited to freshmen and sophomores, with preference to freshmen.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 167 From Microbes to Molecules II

The second term of a yearlong introduction to biology and chemistry through research on soil bacteria isolated from the Yale campus. Focus on the molecular basis of antibiotic activity. Introduction to organic chemistry, the structure of small molecules and their place in central dogma, physical principles underpinning separations science, molecular spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy. Class sessions include lecture and laboratory components.

Prerequisite: MCDB 166. Enrollment limited to freshmen and sophomores, with preference to freshmen.

Professor: Andrew Phillips
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 200 Molecular Biology

A study of the fundamental principles of molecular biology, including the experimental methodologies used in biological research. Topics include the structure, function, and chemical behavior of biological macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and protein), chromosome and genome organization, replication and maintenance of the genome, transcriptional and translational regulation, microRNAs and other noncoding RNAs, RNA processing, and systems biology. Designed to provide an accelerated venue for MCDB majors and other students seeking to understand the molecular basis for gene expression and biological function.

Professor: Anna Marie Pyle, Professor: Farren Isaacs
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 9:00am - 10:15am

MCDB 201L Molecular Biology Lab

Basic molecular biology training in a project-based laboratory setting. Experiments analyze gene function through techniques of PCR, plasmid and cDNA cloning, DNA sequence analysis, and protein expression and purification. Instruction in experimental design, data analysis, and interpretation.

For freshmen and sophomores. Concurrently with or after MCDB 200. Special registration procedures apply. Interested students must contact the instructor and attend an organizational meeting during the first week of classes.

Section 01: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=20950&term=201401

Section 02: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=20949&term=201401

Professor: Maria Moreno
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 202 Genetics

An introduction to classical, molecular, and population genetics of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes and their central importance in biological sciences. Emphasis on analytical approaches and techniques of genetics used to investigate mechanisms of heredity and variation. Topics include transmission genetics, cytogenetics, DNA structure and function, recombination, gene mutation, selection, and recombinant DNA technology.

Professor: Stephen Dellaporta, Professor: Murat Acar
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 203L Laboratory for Genetics

Introduction to laboratory techniques used in genetic analysis. Genetic model organisms—bacteria, yeast, Drosophila, and Arabidopsis—are used to provide practical experience with various classical and molecular genetic techniques including cytogenetics; complementation, epistasis, and genetic suppressors; mutagenesis and mutant analysis, recombination and gene mapping, isolation and manipulation of DNA, and transformation of model organisms.

Concurrently with or after MCDB 202.

Professor: Iain Dawson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 205 Cell Biology

A comprehensive introductory course in cell biology. Emphasis on the general principles that explain the molecular mechanisms of cellular function.   Prerequisite: BIOL 101 and 102, or equivalent performance on the corresponding biological sciences placement examinations, or a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement test in Biology, or a score of 710 or above on the SAT Biology M test, or MCDB 200.

Professor: Maria Moreno, Professor: Thomas D. Pollard, Professor: Shirin Bahmanyar, Professor: Megan King
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday 9:00am - 10:15am

MCDB 210 Developmental Biology

Cellular differentiation and its genetic and molecular control; fertilization, cleavage, and morphogenesis of plants and animals; polarity and positional information; organogenesis and development of specialized tissues; evolution and development.

Prerequisites: BIOL 101, 102, and 103, or equivalent performance on the corresponding biological sciences placement examinations.

Professor: Scott Holley, Professor: Vivian Irish, Professor: Douglas Kankel
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 221L Model Systems in Bio Research

An introduction to research and common methodologies in the biological sciences, with emphasis on the utility of model organisms. Techniques and methods commonly used in biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and molecular and developmental biology; experimental design; data analysis and display; scientific writing.

Concurrently with or after BIOL 101, 102, and 103, or equivalent performance on the corresponding biological sciences placement examinations, or with permission of instructor.

Professor: Maria Moreno
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 230 Rain Forest Expedition & Lab

Preparation for a two-week expedition to one of the world’s rain forests during spring break and for a ten-week summer laboratory experience using samples collected during the expedition. Integrated topics draw on the fields of ecology, microbiology, chemistry, pharmacology, molecular biology, and bioinformatics. Students participate in an original scientific project from field biology to natural product characterization.

Professor: Scott Strobel
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 9:25am - 10:15am

MCDB 240 Biology of Reproduction

Introduction to reproductive biology, with emphasis on human reproduction. Development and hormonal regulation of reproductive systems; sexuality, fertilization, and pregnancy; modern diagnosis and treatment of reproductive and developmental disorders; social and ethical issues.

Prerequisites: BIOL 101, 102, and 103, or equivalent performance on the corresponding biological sciences placement examinations, or a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement test in Biology, or a score of 710 or above on the SAT Biology M test.

Professor: Hugh Taylor, Professor: Joshua Johnson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 10:30am - 11:20am

MCDB 241L Lab: Biology of Reproduction & Development

Laboratory investigation of reproductive and developmental processes in classic vertebrate and invertebrate systems, with emphasis on mammalian reproduction and development. Topics include gametogenesis, ovulation, hormonal control of reproduction, and investigation of embryogenesis in the mouse, frog, and fruit fly.

Enrollment limited. Concurrently with or after MCDB 210 or 240. Not open to freshmen. Special registration procedures apply; students must consult the instructor prior to the first week of classes.

Professor: Joshua Johnson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 261 Introduction to Dynamical Systems in Biology

An introduction to quantitative methods in biology, emphasizing numerical and analytical modeling of static and dynamical processes in biological systems. Topics will include switches, cooperativity, regulatory networks, feedback, signal transduction, and noise in gene expression. For each topic, the relationship between system architecture, dynamical properties, and behavior will be examined. This semester will contain instruction on Matlab and on transforming a cartoon model into a mathematical model that can me simulated in a computer. Students will read and present research papers from the primary literature.

Professor: Thierry Emonet, Professor: Jonathan Howard
Course Type: Undergraduate
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30pm - 3:45pm

MCDB 290 Microbiology

Cell structure of microorganisms, bacterial genetics, microbial evolution and diversity, microbial development, microbial interaction, chemotaxis and motility, gene regulation, microbial genomics, host defense systems, infectious diseases, viruses, and biological weapons.

Prerequisites: BIOL 101, 102, and 103, or equivalent performance on the corresponding biological sciences placement examinations; two terms of organic chemistry; one term of biochemistry, cell biology, or genetics; or with permission of instructor.

Professor: Christine Jacobs-Wagner, Professor: John Wertz
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00pm - 2:15pm

MCDB 291L Laboratory for Microbiology

Practical approaches used when working with microbes, primarily bacteria. Topics include microscopy, culture techniques, biochemical/metabolic assays, and basic environmental and medical microbiology.

Concurrently with or after MCDB 290. Electronic permission key required; students should contact the instructor prior to the first class meeting.

Professor: Iain Dawson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 300 Biochemistry

An introduction to the biochemistry of animals, plants, and microorganisms, emphasizing the relations of chemical principles and structure to the evolution and regulation of living systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 101, 102, 103, and 104, or equivalent performance on the corresponding biological sciences placement examinations; one term of organic chemistry; or with permission of instructor.

Professor: Ronald Breaker, Professor: Nicole Clay
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 301L Laboratory for Biochemistry

An introduction to current experimental methods in molecular biology.

After or concurrently with MB&B 200 or 300. Limited enrollment. Requires preregistration by e-mail to Aruna Pawashe and William Konigsberg prior to the first week of classes.

Section 01: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=11001&term=201303

Section 02: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=11002&term=201303

Professor: William Konigsberg, Professor: Aruna Pawashe
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:30pm - 5:30pm

MCDB 303L Advanced Molecular Biology Lab

A laboratory course that provides advanced research skills in molecular biology. Weekly workshops focus on laboratory practice, experimental design, data analysis, reading of primary literature, scientific presentations, and scientific writing skills. Application of these skills in project-based laboratory training sponsored by a faculty member.

Professor: Maria Moreno, Professor: F Kenneth Nelson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 310 Physiological Systems

Regulation and control in biological systems, emphasizing human physiology and principles of feedback. Biomechanical properties of tissues emphasizing the structural basis of physiological control. Conversion of chemical energy into work in light of metabolic control and temperature regulation.

Prerequisites: CHEM 113 or 115, or PHYS 180 and 181; MCDB <120>, or BIOL 101 and 102.

Professor: W. Mark Saltzman
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 315 Biological Reaction to Injury

Human biology and disease as a manifestation of reaction to injury. Organ structure and function, cell injury, circulatory and inflammatory responses, disordered physiology, and neoplasia.

Professor: S. Hudnall, Professor: Joanna Gibson, Professor: Gilbert Moeckel, Professor: Jon Morrow, Professor: Jeffrey Sklar
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35am - 12:50pm

MCDB 320 Neurobiology

The excitability of the nerve cell membrane as a starting point for the study of molecular, cellular, and systems-level mechanisms underlying the generation and control of behavior.

After a year of college-level chemistry; a course in physics is strongly recommended.

Professor: Haig Keshishian
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 321L Laboratory for Neurobiology

Introduction to the neurosciences. Projects include the study of neuronal excitability, sensory transduction, CNS function, synaptic physiology, and neuroanatomy.

Concurrently with or after MCDB 320.

Section 01: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=11039&term=201303

Section 02: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=11038&term=201303

Professor: Haig Keshishian, Professor: Robert Wyman
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 341L Lab in Electron Microscopy

Techniques in light and electron microscopy.

Enrollment limited; preference to majors in MCDB or MB&B. Students must devote two to three laboratory hours per week in addition to the published meeting time. Students should contact the instructor prior to the first week of classes. After or concurrently with MCDB 205; prior laboratory experience strongly recommended.

Section 01: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=20989&term=201401

Section 02: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=20988&term=201401

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 342L Laboratory in Nucleic Acids I

A project from a research laboratory within the MCDB department, using technologies from molecular and cell biology. Laboratories meet twice a week for the first half of the term.

Concurrently with or after MCDB 202, 205, or 300. Enrollment limited. Special registration procedures apply; students must consult the instructor prior to the first week of classes.

Professor: F Kenneth Nelson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 343L Laboratory in Nucleic Acids II

Continuation of MCDB 342L to more advanced projects in molecular and cell biology, such as making and screening cDNA libraries, microarray screening and analysis, or next-generation DNA sequencing. Laboratories meet twice a week for the second half of the term.

Prerequisite: MCDB 342L or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited. Special registration procedures apply; students must consult the instructor prior to the first week of classes.

Professor: F Kenneth Nelson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 344L Experimental Techniques: Cell Bio

An inquiry-based approach to research in cell and molecular biology, with emphasis on experimental strategies and techniques. Research is module-based and includes topics in gene expression, protein purification, and fluorescence microscopy. Methods include SDS-PAGE, immunoblots, column chromatography, mammalian cell culture, cell fractionation, cell transfection, and phase contrast and confocal microscopy. Prepares for MCDB 475, 485, or 495.

Professor: Joseph Wolenski
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 345L Experimental Strategies: Cell Bio

Continuation of MCDB 344L, with increased emphasis on experimental design and interpretation of data. Students develop semi-independent research projects in modern biomedical research. Emphasis on key components of being a successful principal investigator, including benchwork, seminar presentations, lab meetings, and experimental design. Prepares for MCDB 475, 485, or 495.

Meets during March and April. Prerequisite: MCDB 344L. Special registration procedures apply; interested students must contact the instructor at least eighteen months in advance.

Professor: Joseph Wolenski
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 350 Eipgenetics

Course Type: Undergraduate

MCDB 361 Dynamical Systems in Biology

This course covers advanced topics in computational biology. How do cells compute, how do they count and tell time, how do they oscillate and generate spatial patterns? Topics include time dependent dynamics in regulatory, signal transduction and neuronal networks, fluctuations, growth and form: mechanics of cell shape and motion, spatially heterogeneous processes, diffusion.

Professor: Damon Clark, Professor: Jonathon Howard
Course Type: Undergraduate
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30pm - 3:45pm

MCDB 370 Biotechnology

The principles and applications of cellular, molecular, and chemical techniques that advance biotechnology. The most recent tools and strategies used by industrial labs, academic research, and government agencies to adapt biological and chemical compounds as medical treatments, as industrial agents, or for the further study of biological systems.

Professor: Craig Crews, Professor: Ronald Breaker, Professor: Nicole Clay, Professor: Farren Isaacs, Professor: F Kenneth Nelson, Professor: Joseph Wolenski
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35am - 12:50pm

MCDB 387 Eukaryotic Cell Cycle

The regulation and coordination of the eukaryotic cell cycle examined by means of a detailed critique of primary literature. Particular attention to the role of the cell cycle in the processes of development and differentiation and in cancer and other diseases. Students develop an understanding of experimental approaches to problem solving.

Enrollment limited, with preference to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: BIOL 101, 102, and 103, or equivalent performance on the corresponding biological sciences placement examinations; MCDB 202, 205, or 210. Electronic permission key required. Students must contact the instructor prior to the first class meeting.

Professor: Iain Dawson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 415 Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Study of the processes that transfer molecules across membranes. Classes of molecular machines that mediate membrane transport. Emphasis on interactions among transport proteins in determining the physiologic behaviors of cells and tissues.

Intended for seniors majoring in the biological sciences. Recommended preparation: MCDB 205, 310, 320, or permission of instructor.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 9:25am - 10:15am

MCDB 430 Biology of the Immune System

The development of the immune system. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immune recognition. Effector responses against pathogens. Immunologic memory and vaccines. Human diseases including allergy, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, and HIV/AIDS.

After MCDB 300.

Professor: Carla Rothlin
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 435 Landmark Papers in Cell Biology

Discussion and critical evaluation of selected research papers that were important in determining the directions of modern cell biological research. Emphasis on the nature of the problem, evaluation of the experimental approaches and results, and the authors’ interpretation of the results. Weekly discussion by all participants required.

Students should contact the instructor prior to the first week of classes. Prerequisites: courses in cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics, or permission of instructor.

Professor: Joel Rosenbaum
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 440 Brain Development and Plasticity

Recent advances in scientific understanding of brain development and plasticity, including neuronal determination, axon guidance, synaptogenesis, and developmental plasticity.

Prerequisites: BIOL 101, 102, and 103, or equivalent performance on the corresponding biological sciences placement examinations; MCDB 320 or permission of instructor.

Professor: Weimin Zhong
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 450 The Human Genome

A focus on the primary scientific literature covering the principles of genomics and its application to the investigation of complex human traits and diseases. Topics include the technology of genome sequencing and resequencing, the characterization of sequence and structural variation in human populations, haplotype and linkage disequilibrium analysis, genome-wide association studies, the comparative genomics of humans and our closest relatives, and personalized genomics and medicine.

Enrollment limited to 15. Students should contact the instructor prior to the first week of classes. Prerequisite: MCDB 202; a course in statistics is strongly recommended.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 452 Bioinformatics: Practical Application of Simulation and Data Mining

Techniques in data mining and simulation applied to bioinformatics, the computational analysis of gene sequences, macromolecular structures, and functional genomics data on a large scale. Sequence alignment, comparative genomics and phylogenetics, biological databases, geometric analysis of protein structure, molecular-dynamics simulation, biological networks, microarray normalization, and machine-learning approaches to data integration.

Prerequisites: MB&B 301 and MATH 115, or permission of instructor.

Professor: Mark Gerstein
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00pm - 2:15pm

MCDB 461/ MCDB 599 Concepts and Applications in Systems Biology

Analysis of the primary scientific literature on the topics of gene network design, stochasticity in gene expression, and evolution of genes and networks, in the context of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Critique of the approaches, data analysis, controls, results, and conclusions of selected current and classic papers in systems biology.

Prerequisite: MCDB 261 or 361, or another MCDB course with permission of instructor.

Professor: Murat Acar
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Friday, 3:30pm - 5:30pm

MCDB 474 Independent Research

Research project under faculty supervision taken Pass/Fail. This is the only independent research course available to underclassmen. Students are expected to spend approximately ten hours per week in the laboratory. To register, the student must submit a form, which is available at http://mcdb.yale.edu/forms as well as on the course site on Canvas, and a written plan of study with bibliography, approved by the faculty research adviser. The form and proposal must be uploaded to Canvas by the end of the second week of classes. A final research report is required at the end of the term. Students who take this course more than once must reapply each term. Guidelines for the course should be obtained from the office of the director of undergraduate studies or downloaded Canvas.

Professor: John Carlson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016

MCDB 475 Research

Research projects under faculty supervision, ordinarily taken to fulfill the senior requirement. This course may be taken before the senior year, but it cannot substitute for other requirements. Students are expected to spend approximately ten hours per week in the laboratory. To register, the student must prepare a form (available on the departmental Web site and on the course site on Classes*v2) and a written plan of study with bibliography, approved by the faculty research adviser. The form and proposal must be uploaded to Classes*v2 by the end of the second week of classes. The final research paper is due in the hands of the sponsoring faculty member, with a copy uploaded to Classes*v2, by the last day of classes. Seniors taking this course to fulfill the senior requirement must give an oral presentation of their research at the end of the term. Students who take this course more than once must reapply each term; students planning to conduct two terms of research should consider enrolling in MCDB 485, 486. Students should line up a research laboratory during the term preceding the research.

Fall: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=10751&term=201303

Spring: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=20734&term=201401

Professor: Douglas Kankel
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016, Term: Fall 2016

MCDB 482 Advanced Seminar in Cell Biology: Intracellular Signal Transduction

Discussion of intracellular signal transduction pathways. Detailed critique of experimental approaches, controls, results, and conclusions of selected current and classic papers in this field.

Professor: Craig Crews
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 485 Research in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Individual two-term laboratory research projects under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are expected to spend ten to twelve hours per week in the laboratory, and to make presentations to students and advisers. Written assignments include a short research proposal summary due at the beginning of the first term, a grant proposal due at the end of the first term, and a research report summarizing experimental results due at the end of the second term. Students are also required to present their research in either the fall or the spring term. A poster session is held at the end of the spring term. Students should line up a research laboratory during the term preceding the research. Guidelines for the course may be obtained on the departmental Web site and on the course site on Classes*v2. Written proposals are due by the end of the second week of classes.

Fulfills the senior requirement for the B.S. degree if taken in the senior year.

Professor: Ronald Breaker
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 486 Research in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Individual two-term laboratory research projects under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are expected to spend ten to twelve hours per week in the laboratory, and to make presentations to students and advisers. Written assignments include a short research proposal summary due at the beginning of the first term, a grant proposal due at the end of the first term, and a research report summarizing experimental results due at the end of the second term. Students are also required to present their research in either the fall or the spring term. A poster session is held at the end of the spring term. Students should line up a research laboratory during the term preceding the research. Guidelines for the course may be obtained on the departmental Web site and on the course site on Classes*v2. Written proposals are due by the end of the second week of classes.

Fulfills the senior requirement for the B.S. degree if taken in the senior year.

Professor: Douglas Kankel
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 495 Intensive Research in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Individual two-term laboratory research projects under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are expected to spend ten to twelve hours per week in the laboratory, and to make presentations to students and advisers. Written assignments include a short research proposal summary due at the beginning of the first term, a grant proposal due at the end of the first term, and a research report summarizing experimental results due at the end of the second term. Students are also required to present their research in either the fall or the spring term. A poster session is held at the end of the spring term. Students should line up a research laboratory during the term preceding the research. Guidelines for the course may be obtained on the departmenta Qualified students may undertake directed research in some field of biology during the senior year. Before registering for this course, the student must be accepted for a research project by a Yale faculty member with a research program in experimental biology and obtain the approval of the instructor in charge of the course. Students spend approximately twenty hours per week in the laboratory, and make written and oral presentations of their research to students and advisers. Written assignments include a short research proposal summary due at the beginning of the first term, a grant proposal due at the end of the first term, and a research report summarizing experimental results due at the end of the second term. Students must attend a minimum of three research seminar sessions (including their own) per term. Students are also required to present their research during both the fall and spring terms. A poster session is held at the end of the spring term. Guidelines for the course may be obtained on the departmental Web site and on the course site on Classes*v2. Written proposals are due by the end of the second week of classes.

Fulfills the senior requirement for the B.S. degree with an intensive major.l Web site and on the course site on Classes*v2. Written proposals are due by the end of the second week of classes.

Fulfills the senior requirement for the B.S. degree if taken in the senior year.

Professor: Ronald Breaker
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 496 Intensive Research in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Qualified students may undertake directed research in some field of biology during the senior year. Before registering for this course, the student must be accepted for a research project by a Yale faculty member with a research program in experimental biology and obtain the approval of the instructor in charge of the course. Students spend approximately twenty hours per week in the laboratory, and make written and oral presentations of their research to students and advisers. Written assignments include a short research proposal summary due at the beginning of the first term, a grant proposal due at the end of the first term, and a research report summarizing experimental results due at the end of the second term. Students must attend a minimum of three research seminar sessions (including their own) per term. Students are also required to present their research during both the fall and spring terms. A poster session is held at the end of the spring term. Guidelines for the course may be obtained on the departmental Web site and on the course site on Classes*v2. Written proposals are due by the end of the second week of classes.

Fulfills the senior requirement for the B.S. degree with an intensive major.

Professor: Douglas Kankel
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 585 Research in MCDB for B.S./M.S. Candidates

A two-credit course taken in the third-to-last term (typically the second term of the junior year). At the start of this course, each student forms a committee composed of his or her adviser and two faculty members that meets to discuss the research project. At the end of this course, students complete a detailed prospectus describing their thesis project and the work completed thus far. The committee evaluates an oral and written presentation of this prospectus; the evaluation determines whether the student may continue in the combined program.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 595 Intensive Research in MCDB for B.S./M.S. Candidates

A four-credit, yearlong course (two credits each term) that is similar to MCDB 495 and is taken during the senior year. During this course, students give an oral presentation describing their work. At the end of the course, a student is expected to present his or her work to the department in the form of a poster presentation. In addition, the student is expected to give an oral thesis defense, followed by a comprehensive examination of the thesis conducted by the thesis committee. Upon successful completion of this examination, as well as other requirements, the student is awarded the combined B.S./M.S. degree.

Fall: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=13133&term=201303

Spring: http://students.yale.edu/oci/resultDetail.jsp?course=23032&term=201401

Professor: Ronald Breaker
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Graduate

MCDB 500 Biochemistry

An introduction to the biochemistry of animals, plants, and microorganisms, emphasizing the relations of chemical principles and structure to the evolution and regulation of living systems.

Professor: Ronald Breaker
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 517 Methods and Logic in Interdisciplinary Research

This half-term IGPPEB class is intended to introduce students to integrated approaches to research. Each session is led by faculty with complementary expertise and discusses papers that use different approaches to the same topic (for example, physical and biological or experiment and theory). Counts as 0.5 credit toward graduate course requirements. Required for students in IGPPEB.

Professor: Lynne Regan, Professor: Julien Berro, Professor: Enrique De La Cruz, Professor: Eric Dufresne, Professor: Thierry Emonet, Professor: Paul Forscher, Professor: Jonathon Howard, Professor: Megan King, Professor: Simon Mochrie, Professor: Corey O'Hern, Professor: Thomas D. Pollard, Professor: Yongli Zhang
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 5:00pm - 7:00pm

MCDB 530 Biology of the Immune System

The development of the immune system. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immune recognition. Effector responses against pathogens. Immunologic memory and vaccines. Human diseases including allergy, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, and HIV/AIDS.

Professor: Carla Rothlin
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 550 Physiological Systems

The course develops a foundation in human physiology by examining the homeostasis of vital parameters within the body, and the biophysical properties of cells, tissues, and organs. Basic concepts in cell and membrane physiology are synthesized through exploring the function of skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscle. The physical basis of blood flow, mechanisms of vascular exchange, cardiac performance, and regulation of overall circulatory function are discussed. Respiratory physiology explores the mechanics of ventilation, gas diffusion, and acid-base balance. Renal physiology examines the formation and composition of urine and the regulation of electrolyte, fluid, and acid-base balance. Organs of the digestive system are discussed from the perspective of substrate metabolism and energy balance. Hormonal regulation is applied to metabolic control and to calcium, water, and electrolyte balance. The biology of nerve cells is addressed with emphasis on synaptic transmission and simple neuronal circuits within the central nervous system. The special senses are considered in the framework of sensory transduction. Weekly discussion sections provide a forum for in-depth exploration of topics. Graduate students evaluate research findings through literature review and weekly meetings with the instructor.

Professor: Emile Boulpaep
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 560 Cellular and Molecular Physiology: Molecular Machines in Human Disease

The course focuses on understanding the processes that transfer molecules across membranes at the cellular, molecular, biophysical, and physiological levels. Students learn about the different classes of molecular machines that mediate membrane transport, generate electrical currents, or perform mechanical displacement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the molecular structures of membrane proteins and their individual functions. The interactions among transport proteins in determining the physiological behaviors of cells and tissues are also stressed. Molecular motors are introduced and their mechanical relationship to cell function is explored. Students read papers from the scientific literature that establish the connections between mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins and a wide variety of human genetic diseases.

Professor: Emile Boulpaep, Professor: Frederick Sigworth
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 9:25am - 10:15am

MCDB 561 Introduction to Dynamical Systems in Biology

An introduction to quantitative methods in biology, emphasizing numerical and analytical modeling of static and dynamical processes in biological systems. Topics will include switches, cooperativity, regulatory networks, feedback, signal transduction, and noise in gene expression. For each topic, the relationship between system architecture, dynamical properties, and behavior will be examined. This semester will contain instruction on Matlab and on transforming a cartoon model into a mathematical model that can me simulated in a computer. Students will read and present research papers from the primary literature.

Professor: Thierry Emonet, Professor: Damon Clark, Professor: Murat Acar, Professor: Kathryn Miller-Jensen
Course Type: Graduate

MCDB 562 Dynamical Systems in Biology

This course covers advanced topics in computational biology. How do cells compute, how do they count and tell time, how do they oscillate and generate spatial patterns? Topics include time dependent dynamics in regulatory, signal transduction and neuronal networks, fluctuations, growth and form: mechanics of cell shape and motion, spatially heterogeneous processes, diffusion.

Professor: Damon Clark, Professor: Jonathon Howard
Course Type: Graduate
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30pm - 3:45pm

MCDB 570 Biotechnology

The principles and applications of cellular, molecular, and chemical techniques that advance biotechnology. Topics include the most recent tools and strategies used by government agencies, industrial labs, and academic research to adapt biological and chemical compounds as medical treatments, as industrial agents, or for the further study of biological systems.

Professor: Jonathon Howard, Professor: Craig Crews, Professor: F Kenneth Nelson, Professor: Joseph Wolenski
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35am - 12:50pm

MCDB 591 Integrated Workshop

This required course for students in IGPPEB involves hands-on laboratory modules with students working in pairs. A biology student is paired with a physics or engineering student; a computation/theory student is paired with an experimental student. The modules are devised so that a range of skills are acquired, and students learn from each other.

Professor: Lynne Regan
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 602 Molecular Cell Biology

A comprehensive introduction to the molecular and mechanistic aspects of cell biology for graduate students in all programs. Emphasizes fundamental issues of cellular organization, regulation, biogenesis, and function at the molecular level.

Professor: Sandra Wolin
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 603 Seminar in Molecular Cell Biology

A graduate-level seminar course in modern cell biology. The class is devoted to the reading and critical evaluation of classical and current papers.

The topics are coordinated with the MCDB 602a lecture schedule. Thus, concurrent enrollment in MCDB 602a is required.

Professor: Megan King
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 625 Basic Concepts of Genetic Analysis

The universal principles of genetic analysis in eukaryotes are discussed in lectures. Students also read a small selection of primary papers illustrating the very best of genetic analysis and dissect them in detail in the discussion sections. While other Yale graduate molecular genetics courses emphasize molecular biology, this course focuses on the concepts and logic underlying modern genetic analysis.

Professor: Tian Xu
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 630 Biochemical and Biophysical Approaches in Molecular and Cellular Biology

This graduate course introduces the theory and application of biochemical and biophysical methods to study the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The course considers the basic physical chemistry required in cellular and molecular biology but does not require a previous course in physical chemistry. One class per week is a lecture introducing a topic. The second class is a discussion of one or two research papers utilizing those methods.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30pm - 3:45pm

MCDB 660 Structure, Functions, and Development of Trees and Other Vascular Plants

Morphogenesis and adaptation of vascular plants considered from seed formation and germination to maturity. Physiological and developmental processes associated with structural changes in response to environment discussed from both a phylogenetic and an adaptive point of view.

Professor: Graeme Berlyn
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 670 Advanced Seminar in Biochemistry & Genetics

New aspects of the molecular biology of RNA, ribonucleoproteins, and prions. Topics include the localization and function of RNA and ribonucleoproteins; siRNAs and microRNAs; the role of RNA in dosage compensation, chromosome silencing, and gene regulation; novel ribozymes and RNA technology; prions. Discussion; involvement and attendance are required.

Professor: Sidney Altman, Professor: Ronald Breaker
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 677 Mechanisms of Development

An advanced course on mechanisms of animal development focusing on the genetic specification of cell organization and identity during embryogenesis and somatic differentiation. The use of evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways to carry out developmental decisions in a range of animals is highlighted. Course work includes student participation in critical analysis of primary literature and a research proposal term paper.

Professor: Valerie Reinke
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday 1:30pm - 3:20pm

MCDB 720 Neurobiology

Examination of the excitability of the nerve cell membrane as a starting point for the study of molecular, cellular, and intercellular mechanisms underlying the generation and control of behavior.

Professor: Haig Keshishian, Professor: Paul Forscher
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 721 Laboratory for Neurobiology

MCDB 735 Seminar in Brain Development and Plasticity

Weekly seminars and discussion sessions to explore recent advances in our understanding of brain development and plasticity, including neuronal determination, axon guidance, synaptogenesis, and developmental plasticity.

Professor: Weimin Zhong
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 743 Advanced Eukaryotic Molecular Biology

Selected topics in transcriptional control, regulation of chromatin structure, mRNA processing, mRNA stability, RNA interference, translation, protein degradation, DNA replication, DNA repair, site-specific DNA recombination, somatic hypermutation.

Prerequisite: biochemistry or permission of the instructor.

Professor: Mark Hochstrasser, Professor: Karla Neugebauer, Professor: Matthew Simon, Professor: Patrick Sung
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35am - 12:50pm

MCDB 752 Bioinformatics: Practical Application of Simulation and Data Mining

Bioinformatics encompasses the analysis of gene sequences, macromolecular structures, and functional genomics data on a large scale. It represents a major practical application for modern techniques in data mining and simulation. Specific topics to be covered include sequence alignment, large-scale processing, next-generation sequencing data, comparative genomics, phylogenetics, biological database design, geometric analysis of protein structure, molecular-dynamics simulation, biological networks, normalization of microarray data, mining of functional genomics data sets, and machine learning approaches for data integration.

Prerequisites: biochemistry and calculus, or permission of the instructor.

Professor: Mark Gerstein
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00pm - 2:15pm

MCDB 861 The Human Population Explosion

Global population growth in its human, environmental, and economic dimensions. Social and sociobiological bases of reproductive behavior. Population history and the causes of demographic change. Interactions of population growth with economic development and environmental alteration. Overconsumption of the rich and overpopulation of the poor. “Hot-button” issues surrounding fertility: contraception, abortion, infanticide, and the status of women.

Professor: Robert Wyman
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring

MCDB 900 First-Year Introduction to Research - Grant Writing and Scientific Communication

Grant writing, scientific communication, and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 901 First-Year Introduction to Research—Ethics: Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research

Ethics and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

Professor: Joerg Bewersdorf
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Thursday, 4:15pm - 5:45pm

MCDB 902 Advanced Graduate Seminar

The course allows students to hone their presentation skills through yearly presentation of their dissertation work. Two students each give thirty-minute presentations in each class session. Students are required to present every year beginning in their third year in the MCDB program. Each MCDB graduate student is expected to attend at least 80 percent of the class sessions. Two faculty members co-direct the course, attend the seminars, and provide feedback to the students.

Professor: Valerie Horsley, Professor: Matthew Rodeheffer
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 903 Advanced Graduate Seminar

The course allows students to hone their presentation skills through yearly presentation of their dissertation work. Two students each give thirty-minute presentations in each class session. Students are required to present every year beginning in their third year in the MCDB program. Each MCDB graduate student is expected to attend at least 80 percent of the class sessions. Two faculty members co-direct the course, attend the seminars, and provide feedback to the students.

Professor: Matthew Rodeheffer, Professor: Damon Clark
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 911 First Laboratory Rotation

First laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

Professor: Carl Hashimoto
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 912 Second Laboratory Rotation

Second laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

Professor: Craig Crews
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 913 Third Laboratory Rotation

Third laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

Professor: Craig Crews
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017

MCDB 950 Second-Year Research

By arrangement with faculty.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall

MCDB 951 Second-Year Research

By arrangement with faculty.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017